cold lips or cold flute?
 

cold lips or cold flute?

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cold lips or cold flute?    16:40 on Thursday, April 07, 2005 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(vert jaune rouge)
I`ve got a rubbish flute, but I assume that as a beginner, this shouldn`t stop me from making a decent sound and go to higher octaves.

I do have a decent (err errr errrm) tone after I`ve played for 90 minutes.

That`s the problem, when i take my flute out of the case, it sounds terrible. Makes me feel like calling the police for underable nuisance. I wonder if that`s because my lips have lost the plot and my embouchure needs re-adjusting to the flute, or if this is because the flute is cold and needs to be warmed up.

I suspect (I hope) this is the 2nd scenario because, when I live it in a warm room and play it, it`s sounds ok straight away...

What do u guys think?

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Re: cold lips or cold flute?    18:46 on Thursday, April 07, 2005 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(Fiji)
If a flute has small leaks because it is out of adjustment, then
after a period of playing the leaks may be sealed by the presence of condensation. These leaks could be around pads or the crown cork.

As for the actual temperature of the room - that would probably only affect pitch, unless some viscous, residue from inappropriate oil in the pivots was slightly jamming the mechanism and being softened by the warmth.

Perhpas your lips function better when warm. Try a cold room immediately after a hot shower?


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Re: cold lips or cold flute?    11:11 on Friday, April 08, 2005 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(Grace)
Dear Vert, well, I would underestimate the power of a "rubbish" flute to produce a "rubbish" sound! That said, I have found that after I am warmed up, my sound does improve. But I ALWAYS blow SLOW, warm air through the flute before playing anywhere - just practicing, in orchestra, etc. I have to hightlight the "slow" part, because I hear kids all the time, blow really hard and fast through the flute, which does nothing. Slow, warm air with all the keys depressed (like for low C) warms the flute. Metal rings better when it`s warm. As far as your lips being "cold" - the mornings are the WORST for trying to get a good sound. Keeping them supple is really important, so maybe try wearing chapstick to bed. If you have 90 minutes to practice (as a beginner, that is awesome!), then I would suggest that if you really want to improve your sound, so that you can get a better sound each days, start doing long tones. I wrote a post on "Ideas for tone improvement" which no one seemed to be interested in here (shock, horror!) but maybe there`s something there that would be helpful to you! Good luck!

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Re: cold lips or cold flute?    11:12 on Friday, April 08, 2005 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(Grace)
Sorry, that`s "wouldn`t" underestimate...

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Re: cold lips or cold flute?    13:38 on Monday, April 11, 2005 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(wanderer)
I agree with the above post and was going to write practicly the samething so I`ll second that post.

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Re: cold lips or cold flute?    15:57 on Thursday, April 14, 2005 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(Tanya)
Although the flute does not make the player having a good flute helps. It sounds to me like you are a new player. As a new player the flute is difficult enough without the challenge of a poorly made insturment.
What brand is your flute?
About how old is it?
Assuming you are a new player sit down and decide if the flute is something you really want to pursue, if so then either buy, rent or borrow a good flute. It will help you feel less discouraged with your tone. You will also be able to hear yourself improving on a better flute.

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Re: cold lips or cold flute?    18:18 on Thursday, April 14, 2005 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(Fiji)
vert jaune rouge wrote:

"I`ve got a rubbish flute, but I assume that as a beginner, this shouldn`t`t stop me from making a decent sound and go to higher octaves."

Providing the flute is in a reasonable state of adjustment, then that is quite true, unless the flute is of an EXCEEDINGLY poor type.

We don`t really know what we are discussing here unless you can say a bit more about exactly what sort of flute we are talking about. Brand, model, age, state of adjustment.

As for whether it is the player....

I doubt that there is any player who does not have bad days, when their embouchure just does not seem to be its normal self. The variation in performance due the state of the player, IMHO, is far greater and more frequent for beginners. To illustrate, I`m sure we all recall that as starters on flute, we could sometimes get a note, and sometimes we couldn`t, even from one minute to the next...

EVERY part of the body functions a little better some days than others.

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Re: cold lips or cold flute?    18:55 on Thursday, April 14, 2005 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(vert jaune rouge)
my flute is called an "intermusic". A teacher tried it and said ith was rubbish and i can`t really do much about the `tinny` sound.
I bought it new $220 on ebay. It sounds much better when I leave it close to the heater, even though my lips are cold.
The flutes that I try in shops sound really good on high register, but i`d like to master the one I have... to me it`s like learning football with a tennis ball (i.e., improving precision and accuracy).

Thanks guys for your advice.

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Re: cold lips or cold flute?    21:03 on Thursday, April 14, 2005 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(Tanya)
No offence to you or your flute, but to master that flute would be a waste of time. My grandmother bought me my first flute new out of a discount catalog for $200. I never made progress on it and had it for four years until it literally fell apart.
I now have an Armstrong 103B that I have had for a year this week. I love it!!! I`m improving on it and do not have to work nearly as hard to get a sound out of it.
If I were you I would go to a reputable music store and buy or rent a new or used flute by a popular brand name.
Some brand names are Yamaha, Armstrong, Gemiendhardt, Pearl, Emerson, E.M. Winston and there are a few more.
Anybody can feel free to add or take away from my little brand list.
Good luck with your decision.

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Re: cold lips or cold flute?    21:29 on Thursday, April 14, 2005 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(Fiji)
vert jaune rouge, I think dedication is worthy and your your comment is fair.

I first learnt on a junk (because it was out of adjustment) flute. Because of my efforts to master it, I developed sufficient skill to play all the low notes, whereas my very accomplished teacher, spoilt for deades with a top model Haynes, could not get a sound out below F.

I think there is a message somewhere there.

I believe that the struggle I had with this flute was what gave me the foundation for a very good tone with better flutes later. Those early days with the crap flute were most certainly not a waste of time for me.

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Re: cold lips or cold flute?    15:25 on Saturday, April 16, 2005 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(vertjaunerouge)
i think i`ll stick to fiji`s advice for the time being, for technical reasons (lip muscles, embouchure...) then I`ll follow tanya`s advice because no matter how goo I become, this flute cannot sound nice (2 professionals tried it and it`s aweful) and, at the end of the day, i need to enjoy what i hear.

   

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