Offset G vs. Inline G
 

Offset G vs. Inline G

Search Forums: 
    
[-]
Offset G vs. Inline G    13:48 on Tuesday, June 06, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Penny
(218 points)

Does an Inline G sound any different then an Offset G or is it just for people with freakishly long ring fingures? lol

[-]
Re: Offset G vs. Inline G    14:57 on Tuesday, June 06, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

kippsix
(333 points)

Well they shouldn't sound any different. I have always played on an inline flute and I actually have short fingers. The best bet is to go with what feels right for yourself.

[-]
Re: Offset G vs. Inline G    17:24 on Tuesday, June 06, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

jose_luis
(2365 points)

According to some experienced opinions in this Forum (I am not included in that group), in-line G seem to be trendy and it has been adopted as a feature of professional instruments, porobably for marketing reasons. Same thing with the B foot in USA.

But there seem to be no real advantage and in fact it complicates a little the mechanism.

I started my learning with ofsset G because my student flute had this feature (and I have really long fingers) and then I chose the offset G in my new Yamaha. I decided that risking a change to in-line made no sense. Playing on the offset was already enough stress for my LH fingers!

[-]
Re: Offset G vs. Inline G    17:29 on Tuesday, June 06, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Flutist06
(1545 points)

The only reason that in line G flutes exist is that a French flute maker by the name of Louis Lot (you may have heard of him...He's quite famous) started making flutes this way, as it eliminated a rod and allowed him to get more flutes out the door for a greater profit. Since he was widely acknowledged as one of the greatest flutemakers of the day (late 1800's to early/mid 1900's), other companies started doing it too, and it just spread. The original flutes designed by Theobald Boehm (who is responsible for the mechanism on modern flutes) called for an offset G. Because often it is children that are beginners, and they have smaller hands, the offset was used on beginner level instruments, and the in line on professional instruments, so some people today still believe that a professional flute must have an inline G. This is absolutely ridiculous, as neither offers a better tone or affects intonation in any way. The only consideration is if you want to have a Split E mechanism on the flute. These, in combination with an in line G, can cause the mechanism to bind, so if you want a Split E, you're better off going with an offset or half offset mechanism. Other than that, it is up to personal preference and comfort (and if it's an openhole, or French, flute, the ease with which you can cover the hole). Most flute makers today, if asked which way they make more custom flutes, will tell you that there is a big surge in purchases of offset G's, as the relatively recent revelation of repetitive stress injuries and carpal tunnel have inclined people to the more ergonomic offset G. For people with larger hands, the inline G can be more comfortable, however. I personally prefer an offset, though I can play just as well on an inline. Hope that helps!

[-]
Re: Offset G vs. Inline G    17:55 on Tuesday, June 06, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Penny
(218 points)

The one i have is an Offset G. My hand can fit comfortably on the key and i have long fingures. But i've never played on an Inline.

[-]
Re: Offset G vs. Inline G    19:11 on Tuesday, June 06, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Patrick
(1743 points)

I have played both, it is a matter of comfort and convenience

[-]
Re: Offset G vs. Inline G    19:42 on Tuesday, June 06, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

schoolgirl0125
(613 points)

I heard somewhere that a Inline G would most likely cause wrist problem vs. a Offset G...?

<Added>

A lot professionals always say how people students who begin should use a offset and continue to..best way. That's what i hear a lot

[-]
Re: Offset G vs. Inline G    19:59 on Tuesday, June 06, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Flutist06
(1545 points)

Well the offset G is more ergonomic for a lot of people, but for those with larger hands, it can be much more comfortable to use an inline G, like I said above. As long as you don't put too much stress into your hands/wrist in an attempt to cover the hole that your fingers are just too short to reach (i.e. as long as you are using the one that is most appropriate to your playing comfortwise and don't try to force yourself to play the other if it's uncomforatble), neither should cause more wrist problems. As above, neither will offer any advantage other than comfort, so there is no reason for a professional to play on an inline G rather than an offset, though generally (obviously not true 100% of the time, as evidenced by some of our members) students are children (with smaller hands), so an offset G is more comfortable and allows a more natural hand position.

[-]
Re: Offset G vs. Inline G    00:46 on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Flutist06
(1545 points)

I'm glad to see you liked my answers, Micron! But the hand size can have an impact. Since all the fingers are longer, the ring finger can now reach with only a bit more bend in the other fingers. Though having ring fingers longer than the rest would certainly do it too. And Micron, I'm interested by that bit about turning your head to the left to make an inline G more ergonomic. Could you please elaborate on how that helps?

[-]
Re: Offset G vs. Inline G    02:41 on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

kippsix
(333 points)

As I stated, I play an inline (app. forty years worth), I have small hands and fingers. I especially have a very short "pinkie" finger. My theory is that I don't have a problem covering the open holes of my inline because I adopted a position to deal with my short pinkie finger. I must be "pulling" my pinkie in towards the G#, which in turn puts the rest of my fingers easily in place for the inline G. Or, I could just be a mutant.

[-]
Re: Offset G vs. Inline G    21:56 on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Tibbiecow
(480 points)

I have a student flute -closed holes, offset G, and pro flute- open holes, inline G. I can use my student flute as a backup because it fits my fancy headjoints.

My hands are narrow, but my fingers are long. I have no trouble reaching the inline G, but my right hand ring finger really easily overshoots the D key, so that one is plugged on my pro flute, otherwise I have trouble going to lowest C.

I have trouble buying gloves; the ones that fit my fingers are way too big around the hand, and those that fit the hand are way too short in the fingers. My husband is 6'3" and my fingers are longer than his, but his hands are a LOT bigger than mine!
It comes down to what is comfortable for tha individual player.

For people with serious problems, I have seen John Lunn's articles on flute ergonomics and key extensions to be very interesting. Any really good flute with inline G can be modified with a key extension to be comfortable for its player. The problem would be that this would possibly devalue the flute for resale, so it would be done only for a REALLY nice flute. If offset G were sufficient, most people would just sell the inline and buy an offset G flute.

The serious performance/repetitive motion injury problems that some people have are a real eye-opener. I am not quite as 'perfectionist' about my right hand fingers being perfectly centered on the keys because I don't want to get hurt. There is a balance between 'correct' position, the ability to play well, and ergonomics.

If I bought a new flute, it would probably be offset G, but I would be much more interested in other features, such as headjoint, scale, feel of the mechanism, etc.

[-]
Re: Offset G vs. Inline G    23:20 on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

StephenK
(395 points)

I don't think it is an issue of hand size either. It would seem that in-line would be more ergonomic for players whose ring finger is longer than their middle finger.


Offset vs inline for people with large hands:
1. Inline - Form a C shape with your hand, with your middle two fingers on your thumb.

2. Offset - Form a C shape with your hand, with your middle two fingers in the bend of the thumb.

There is stress both when you stretch your fingers too much and when you crunch them too much.

I can play either, but the crunch of the fingers becomes especially noticable doing something like an G#-A trill.

Simply switching between offset and inline and trilling away with the left hand will reveal which one it most ergonomic.

A funny thing I discovered while playing with a flute with split-E is that I find the balance bar actually forces me to arch my right hand (to avoid it) in a very comfortable position, it helps keep me from scrunching the right hand, but I could see it getting in the way for those with more petite hands... forcing a right hand stretch in order to avoid the rod (depending on their flute's balance bar placement).

<Added>

I meant "which one IS ergonomic" sorry.

[-]
Re: Offset G vs. Inline G    17:05 on Thursday, June 08, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Flutist06
(1545 points)

That does make a bit of sense. I really needed that exaggeration to understand, though! I usually play with the right arm pushed forward a bit, and I play out the left side of my mouth a bit, anyway, so I was using that as a starting point, which made it much more difficult to notice the difference. Thanks for your explanation, by the way!

[-]
Re: Offset G vs. Inline G    17:22 on Thursday, June 08, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Penny
(218 points)

Tibbiecow, yeah my ring finger overshoots that key too. There's also the problem with my thumbs, They naturaly curve backwards instead of being strait so when i play I have to bring my wrists down way below my fingers and it causes cramps.

[-]
Re: Offset G vs. Inline G    21:28 on Thursday, June 08, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

writergirl25
(55 points)

I have relatively short fingers and started playing on an offset G. But when I got my new Gemeinhardt, it had an inline G. While it took some time to get use to, I am still able to play just as well on the inline as I did on the offset. However, I will admit that the offset can be more comfortable.

   





This forum: Older: butterflys oh no!
 Newer: Scheherazade



8notes in other languages:
             


 
© 2000-2014 8notes.com