Re: Flute tarnish
 

Re: Flute tarnish

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Re: Flute tarnish    17:47 on Monday, February 20, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

JButky
(657 points)

"What is still unclear to me is why the rate of tarnishing has accelerated enormously since it was polished. As far as I can tell, no other variables have changed."

Like I said, Cleaning (polish) leaves more silver exposed to air as I described before. Hence the rate is faster all else being equal.

Tarnish shield application during service does help !****! the process, so make sure it's done properly..

Joe B

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Re: Flute tarnish    17:50 on Monday, February 20, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

cflutist
(175 points)

Joe,

Is Tarnish Shield a liquid that is applied to the flute?
If so, is it applied to the body proper and not the keys/mechanism? I'm guessing that you don't want to do anything to gum up the mechanism.

Thanks for your explanation.

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Re: Flute tarnish    18:24 on Monday, February 20, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

JButky
(657 points)

If so, is it applied to the body proper and not the keys/mechanism?


Yes that is correct. The keywork is completely removed before tarnish shield is applied. There is a correct procedure that I'm sure not everyone follows for maximum effect. Funny how directions on the package often get overlooked or forgotten.

Joe B

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Re: Flute tarnish    18:40 on Friday, March 02, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

whiteandproud
(15 points)

Another chance for cflutist to list off his/her high dollar flutes. *Rolls eyes*

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Re: Flute tarnish    07:46 on Thursday, March 29, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Watcher
(57 points)

Here's another bit of info that I didn't realize was significant. My flute teacher saw the discoloration on my flute, and told me that it wasn't tarnish. Tarnish is black. This color looks copper or gold. If you look at a certain part of my flute from a little bit of distance, you'd swear it was a gold flute. Though as mentioned earlier, its not even - the color change is most predominant on the parts of the flute that I do NOT touch. Wherever my fingers come in contact, its still bright silver.

Does this mean anything to anybody?

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Re: Flute tarnish    08:20 on Thursday, March 29, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

JButky
(657 points)

I think we covered this before. That is that is the sulfur deposit that if left on the surface that will eventually turn black if left untouched. In that state it easily wipes off. If left on it will begin to turn to black tarnish requiring more harsh methods of removal.

Joe B

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Re: Flute tarnish    09:42 on Thursday, March 29, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

cflutist
(175 points)

Joe,

Is there anything special that we should use to wipe it off?

I have been blotting a little alcohol on a microfiber cloth (it is barely damp as alcohol naturally evaporates) and that seems to help. No black tarnish yet on my 1.5 year old flute and we live 10 miles from a refinery.

<Added>

But I do have a little of the lighter tarnish that Watcher speaks of.

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Re: Flute tarnish    12:57 on Thursday, March 29, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

JButky
(657 points)

You don't need anything special to wipe it off. It will even come off by wiping it with your finger. Your regular cleaning cloth is fine. You will usually notice that yellow glow buried under the keywork by the ribs because your hands don;t get in there with regular handling to merely wipe it off. It's best to have the keys taken off and hand cleaned by your tech during a regular service. If not, You can get a lot of it cleaned off with a regular q tip.

Joe B

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Re: Flute tarnish    13:03 on Thursday, March 29, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

cflutist
(175 points)

Regarding Q-tips, check the "Personal Care" packets that you find in hotel rooms. Although I normally don't use them, I opened one up to find miniature Q-tips that work even better between the key work. Since we were there for five nights, I stocked up on them
:-)

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Re: Flute tarnish    10:59 on Saturday, April 28, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

cqflute
(1 point)

Hi,guys.It's very helpful to see this posts. Here is my experience.I got my Brannen last Dec. I was so excited after 6 months waiting...I opend it and played only 30 mins...GOD...the tubing where I touching starting ture black...I thought something really wrong...I knew the sivler flute get this, but never think this quick...It's discord with it's big luxury tone(the Lafin headjoin is ROCK!)I called Brannen, asked them what's going on. they said it's normal. And they noticed I live in Florida by the sea area. They said never go to play outside...The first 30 mins.I was playing my New Brannen on my Landlord big grass land. Now I been very careful about about where I play...And I realize the silver flute never like moisture...keep post

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Re: Flute tarnish    14:21 on Monday, August 06, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

cflutist
(175 points)

Just found this on the Burkart website. Makes total sense to me in regards to tarnish.
That explains why my Emerson Alto Flute and Gemmy camping flute look brand new after 12 years while there is tarnish on my Haynes, Brannen, and piccolo.

Why do professional level silver flutes sometimes tarnish? My student flute never did.


A: Low to mid price flutes are silver plated. Even flutes with solid silver body are usually silver plated over the solid silver to reduce manufacturing time and cost. Plating is applied to a surface with a 'strike' or thin coat of nickel or copper and then a thin coat of pure silver. The pure silver does not tarnish. However, if there is ever damage (scratches, dents, etc) to the body, it cannot be repaired without removing the silver plating and exposing the 'strike' layer - a permanent, unsightly mess. Also the thin layer of silver plate can erode in the hands of a player with acidic perspiration.

The solid silver flute (un-plated) is superior in sound to silver plated flutes. It is also easily repaired to as new condition. Silver is a precious metal and, like gold, it is too soft for flutemaking in pure form. To make it more durable and stronger it is often alloyed with small amounts of copper and other metals. It is this copper which reacts with atmospheric sulfides, chlorides, ambient humid air, etc., to form a thin cloudy to dark area on the flute. The good news is, it's no big deal. Tarnish in no way affects the way the flute sounds, and can be removed upon overhaul which includes a machine buffing of the keys and body.

When you perspire, salts and acids released in the perspiration can cause tarnish. This problem can be worse in seacoast areas where chlorides combine with perspiration. Medication and changes in hormone balance during adolescence can cause elevated levels of perspiration acid. Frequently, the developing flutist advances from a student model flute to a professional silver flute during adolescent years, and we note that the accelerated tarnish issue often disappears by the time a first overhaul is done (8 to 10 years after purchase).

Burkart does offer two silver flute bodies with superior tonal attributes that are not alloyed with copper and do not tarnish like sterling silver. See 998 flute and 5-95 flute in Metal Options.


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Re: Flute tarnish    13:22 on Thursday, August 09, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Watcher
(57 points)

Cflutist,
Thanks, good info.
What i find particularly weird about this whole situation is that your info, like everything else I've seen, affirms that perspriation causes or accelerates tarnish. So far, I'm the only person I know whose perspiration REDUCES tarnish. Ie, my flute tarnishes everywhere except where I touch it.
Between that, my teardrop embouchure, and my unique method of speaking the letter "T", I seem to be the real outcast of the flute world.
Maybe I should change my handle!

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Re: Flute tarnish    03:40 on Friday, August 10, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Plekto
(423 points)

My "trick" is to use a miniature can of desiccant (exactly the size to fit in the foot joint's tenon) to keep moisture in my case to nearly zero.

A couple of those silica packs also can work. I notice that tarnish is much greater during summer months due to more sweat and humidity in the air, so getting rid of moisture when you store the flute is a huge help.

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Re: Flute tarnish    00:37 on Sunday, December 09, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

timflute
(1 point)

I bought Town Talk anti tarnish silver polish, you might want to try it. If the parts you dont touch tarnish, it doesnt mean the parts are not exposed, i suggest all parts should be wiped after you play

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Re: Flute tarnish    14:22 on Wednesday, January 30, 2013 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Watcher
(57 points)

Just one more interesting note for anybody still interested in this saga - I've just sent my flute to Muramatsu for service and polishing. Muramatsu called me right back to ask me about it - they were bewildered by the colors and placement of this tarnish - the woman said she had rarely seen this before, and then only when the flute was stored right next to a gas fireplace (which doesn't apply here). I've stopped storing my flute on the stand, so hopefully this next polish will last a bit longer.

   





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