Flute for College
 

Flute for College

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Flute for College    15:06 on Saturday, December 07, 2013 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

evflute17
(57 points)

I currently play on an altus azumi brittania silver flute, with plated keys. Its a good flute that I got used from a friend. I had a college audition recently and the professor thought that I played beautifully, but that I should invest in a better flute before college. The way she said it was its a decent flute, but it may not be the flute for you. I've always thought this in some capacity because the keywork drives me crazy sometimes, however it produces a big rich sound that I love. She recommended that I get a powell or a powell sonare. Can anyone give me advice on a good college flute that I wouldn't break the bank on ( like less than 10k). I figured that if I'm going to get a new flute I might as well go and get a pro flute.

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Re: Flute for College    03:40 on Thursday, December 12, 2013 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

michaelnguyenflu
te

If your flute has held up fine over the years and you enjoy your sound on it, you'll probably be fine for a while. What exactly is wrong with the mechanism?

Powells are great, but there are lots of other brands that are just as good. Try Haynes, Muramatsu, Miyazawa, and Burkart for a start -- can't go wrong with any of those. A $10,000 limit can get you a real nice flute so just go to a flute shop and try everything you can!

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Re: Flute for College    03:45 on Thursday, December 12, 2013 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

michaelnguyenflu
te

Oh and if you like the Altus Azumi, definitely consider a handmade Altus flute! They play quite well. I get a really bright sound on them. I do remember the keys being super springy/light -- more so than most.

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Re: Flute for College    19:35 on Friday, December 13, 2013 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

evflute17
(57 points)

For me the mechanism just doesn't flow like its supposed to. Its hard to describe, and it goes out of alignment alot, the key tension doesn't stay constant. It just feels like every few months I put more and more money into keeping it up. I'm considering a pearl right now. It'll probably be a bit less than a year until I can upgrade, but I wanna start now so I know how much I need to save.

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Re: Flute for College    21:02 on Sunday, December 15, 2013 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

cflutist
(175 points)

If you want a really nice feeling mechanism, get a Brannen. It is buttery smooth and puts my Haynes (my backup flute) to shame.

From their website:
The Brögger flute is the flute most people are referring to when they speak of a "Brannen-Cooper®" flute.

The Brögger flute is a Boehm system flute that uses a major mechanical modification developed by the Danish flutemaker, Johan Brögger, about 20 years ago. While Boehm flutes have proven themselves remarkably reliable for 150 years, there have always been two problems associated with them that frequently require maintenance:

misadjustment between certain keys in the "main line," e.g., between D and E to F#, or between A to Bb, and
binding problems between the G key and the Bb key on inline flutes.
The Brögger Mekanik™, with its use of non-rotating shafts and full-size back connectors for all main line keys, effectively eliminates these common problems. The resulting flute is noticeably quieter with reduced friction and far less wear to its moving parts.

There are two additional advantages to the Brögger Mekanik™. First, the flutemaker now has the ability to regulate the spring tension of each key independently of any other, thus allowing for a much more even feel for the performer. The second, equally important feature is the increased strength of the mechanism, especially as it applies to accidents in which the flute is dropped. We have now had 15 years of experience with this mechanism, and our experience bears out this statement in the most remarkable fashion.



<Added>

While the price new is above your budget, you may be able to find a used one.

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Re: Flute for College    01:43 on Tuesday, December 17, 2013 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Perspicacity
(7 points)

And might I add that Brannen flutes sound lovely, and have a laudable consistency in their quality, unlike some flutes from other Boston makers.

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Re: Flute for College    06:54 on Tuesday, December 17, 2013 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Bilbo
(1328 points)

"I figured that if I'm going to get a new flute I might as well go and get a pro flute" Try for a used pro or upper level intermediate. Ideally, I would want a qualified assistant with me as I try out used flutes at a few used flutes at one of the bigger shops. The trips are worth it.
The other issue is that head sections are often able to be interchanged.

What is the instructor suggesting? This may have a bearing on your future experiences once you are in music school.

~bilbo
N.E. Ohio

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Re: Flute for College    09:23 on Tuesday, December 17, 2013 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Bilbo
(1328 points)

I also like the qualities of the Brannen and I would put them in a top billing if I were in the market for a professional flute.
"unlike some flutes from other Boston makers." <I don't necessarily agree with this criticism. I happen to have over 3 decades of performance experience with one of the Boston makers' flutes and I know of many other players who are proud of another brand's qualities. A third brand is being used by one (or more) of the best players on the planet.

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Re: Flute for College    11:24 on Tuesday, December 17, 2013 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

cflutist
(175 points)

I think that any of the Boston flutes would be fine. All are highly regarded and I know others who play them.
In no particular order: Arista, Burkart, Brannen, Haynes, Nagahara, Powell, Straubinger, Williams, and more.

When I first started playing back in the late 1960s, only Powell and Haynes were available.
They just started importing Muramatsu into the US.
Isn't it wonderful that there are so many good choices today.

OP should just try all of them to see what works best for them.
You can also record yourself to hear what the audience would hear.
Perhaps attend one of the NFA Conventions so you can try all of them if you want.
Private appointments are also available in their suites to audition in a more quiet environment.

One can also mix and match headjoints and bodies.
I sent my Williams HJ to Brannen Brothers so that they could make the body barrel to fit my HJ.

Good luck on your search.

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Re: Flute for College    13:56 on Tuesday, January 07, 2014 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Tutti_Flutey
(29 points)

I play a Haynes Amadeus 900 and it's fantastic. It has a rich sound, and the mechanism is smooth. There are a lot of available options as well like C# trill and 14k riser. I chose this over Powell sonare and Altus azumi when I was in the market.

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Re: Flute for College    11:12 on Wednesday, January 08, 2014 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

mabear64
(1 point)

Also check the pawn shops I play a heritage flute by Armstrong that is about 40 years old it is silver with with Bfoot I found for about 79 dollars at the pawn shop of all places the sound is amazing, I spent another 120 fixing a cork that came lose and adjustments there are not screws on it so I had to take it in. this is a professional model that would normally be out of my price range and it sounds great with the orchestra. As good as if not better then my other professional flute (I paid more for then my car costs)

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Re: Flute for College    13:14 on Saturday, January 11, 2014 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

evflute17
(57 points)

Does anyone know anything about the quality of Yamaha flutes? I know alot of people use their flute bodies with upgraded headjoints, so I was thinking this may be an option. The yamaha 800 series body with a headjoint such as nagahara, pearl, garner, powell, or muramatsu.

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Re: Flute for College    13:52 on Saturday, January 11, 2014 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Tutti_Flutey
(29 points)

I personally am not a fan of Yamaha. I found them overpriced and fairly stiff. A Yamaha with the same configuration as my Amadeus would have cost twice as much, and the mechanism was much less fluid.

   

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