Instruments | Styles | Artists | Members | Forums |
      Subscribe Register Login 
how long do reeds last and how do you know if a reed is DOA? 
 

how long do reeds last and how do you know if a reed is DOA?

Search Forums: 
    
[-]
how long do reeds last and how do you know if a reed is DOA?    19:46 on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

kmcintyre
(9 points)

I've been playing for a few weeks now. My one and only reed (a soft from my local music store) has worked fine. But I'm noticing that it seems that I'm getting wrong octaves and squeaks more frequently. I'm also noting that as my practice session progresses things seem to deteriorate.

I'm sure some of what I'm detecting is newbie player related. But I'm wondering if my reed is getting tired too?

Questions -
1) how do reeds fail?
2) how do I know it's time for a new reed?
3) can one reed last an hour of playing, or should one swap out a reed after a shorter period of time?
4) as a newbie, should I stick with soft reeds?
5) where should I buy reeds? Are EBay specials any good?

Thanks!

[-]
Re: how long do reeds last and how do you know if a reed is DOA?    15:15 on Thursday, December 31, 2009 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

OboeNightmare
(153 points)

Okay, first off, store-bought reeds are never going to last as long as handmade reeds. This happens because most machine-made reeds are quite softer than handmade reeds.

In answer to your questions:

1. Reeds fail mostly by the closing of the two blades due to the vibration of the reeds wearing the cane down. Eventually the reed shuts until it will no longer play.

2. Whenever you can't get a sound out of it any longer!

3. A decent reed SHOULD last an hour. You should only switch reeds if you feel the need in between different types of pieces such as a very soft reed for a technical piece and a very hard reed for a lyrical piece etc.

4. As a beginner, medium-soft reeds are usually the way to go. They get you used to resistance and give you a sense of stability in tone which soft reeds tend to not have.
As you become a more experienced player, you should challenge yourself with harder reeds, but only as much as you feel comfortable with. (If you have a teacher, you should always ask their advice on topics like this!!)

5. Your teacher is the best option for reeds if you have one. Some professional oboists sell reeds online that you can buy if you don't have a teacher or don't like their reeds. www.oxfordreeds.com is an example of a website where you can buy reeds. www.goodtoneguild.com is another. Some Ebay reeds are suitable, but ALWAYS check to see if they are handmade before buying and ask about the hardness as well.

Hope this helps!

[-]
Re: how long do reeds last and how do you know if a reed is DOA?    16:06 on Thursday, December 31, 2009 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Canadian
(903 points)

1) Reeds fail when they stop vibrating. There are a large number of ways reeds will fail: leaking in between the blades, the back might be too thin, rails collapsed, the tip might be chipped.

2) When you can't play the reed in tune, or the reed keeps closing up on you you've got to get a new reed.

3) Some people like to change up reeds. I like sticking to one. You should be able to play for way longer than an hour before switching reeds. I've played for 7 hours straight on the same oboe reed.

4)& 5) As a new player you shouldn't stick to soft reeds. The definition of "soft" varies so much in the reed makers world. Get a professional oboist to make you reeds or buy them online at Good Tone Guild, Cooper Wright, ect. Get a reed which works for you and is the right resistance for you. Don't worry about "strength" because that word doesn't mean much amongst reed makers. Resistance is a key word.


[-]
Re: how long do reeds last and how do you know if a reed is DOA?    18:53 on Thursday, December 31, 2009 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

kmcintyre
(9 points)

I'm going to try some good tone guild signature reeds in med soft. Thanks for the lead.

As for a teacher, I was kinda counting on you guys being my teachers! (that and method books...) :-)

Seriously, I figure I'll see how far I can get on my own. This isn't my first dance. Plus these days one can post mp3 and you tube clips for critical review and feedback.

Know of any teachers that do lessons over the internet? Better on the carbon footprint. (Could be a revenue stream for some of you expert players...)

Happy New Year! May 2010 be a blessed and prosperous year for all. :-)

Peace, out...

[-]
Re: how long do reeds last and how do you know if a reed is DOA?    19:12 on Thursday, December 31, 2009 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Canadian
(903 points)

I hate to break it to you but you will need to get a teacher. Imo you can't learn oboe with out one. Seriously, get a teacher.

[-]
Re: how long do reeds last and how do you know if a reed is DOA?    21:59 on Thursday, December 31, 2009 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

InstrumentCrazy
(219 points)

I know of this one man who does lessons over the internet. I hope it helps!

http://www.reedmaker.com/onlinelessons.html

Seriously though, if you don't have a teacher learning the oboe will become very frustrating! If I didn't have lessons I would have quit by now.

[-]
Re: how long do reeds last and how do you know if a reed is DOA?    04:08 on Friday, January 01, 2010 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Canadian
(903 points)

Agreed. It's a real shame to see oboists who don't take lessons because of money/life/being too busy. If you can get lessons for sure! The oboe is troubling enough to play when you have a private teacher! I couldn't imagine playing oboe without a teacher!

[-]
Re: how long do reeds last and how do you know if a reed is DOA?    14:55 on Friday, January 01, 2010 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

OboeLover4Life
(121 points)

These guys are right. Online lessons are the next best thing, but if at all possible you should get them in person.
I wouldn't be where I am today if I didn't have my teacher. I've only playing for two years but I feel very comfortable playing pieces like the Mozart Oboe Quartet, Haydn Oboe Concerto, and Saint Saens (this years all-state NYSSMA xD).

Hence you could say I've been playing flute for 5 years now. But quite honestly I sound kinda !***!ty lol. I took kinda the route you're taking for the Oboe. I ended up trying to correct a lot of bad habits that I probably could have avoided in the first place had I a good teacher.



[-]
Re: how long do reeds last and how do you know if a reed is DOA?    20:05 on Friday, January 01, 2010 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

kmcintyre
(9 points)

Well, truth be told, after losing 600K USD in home equity and 100K USD in my retirement account, there is no budget for lessons. Every free dollar needs to go to repairing my retirement in the few years I have left.

Learning oboe is suppose to be cheap entertainment... :-)

I have no aspirations of becoming a professional oboe player. If I can play some heads to some jazz standards as a complement to guitar and piano, I'll be happy. I play cheap coffee houses. :-)

Maybe I can find a teacher willing to give me quarterly checkups...

But thanks for the advice.

[-]
Re: how long do reeds last and how do you know if a reed is DOA?    21:04 on Monday, January 04, 2010 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
   

This forum: Older: Fox Renard 330 Oboe, with or without Bb vent key?
 Newer: Help ID This Buffet Crampon Carl Fischer Oboe

 




8notes in other languages:              


 
© 2000-2014 8notes.com