E, A, And D major scale slide positions
 

E, A, And D major scale slide positions

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E, A, And D major scale slide positions    22:51 on Wednesday, August 22, 2007 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

JamesZ
(2 points)

So I was learning the 12 major scales for trombone. And I thought I had those three right, but I didn't. Does anybody know them.

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Re: E, A, And D major scale slide positions    21:56 on Thursday, August 23, 2007 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

bobsacamano
(158 points)

Major scale: W=Whole Step. H=Half Step

W W H W W W H

Once you learn this pattern you can play a major scale in any key.

Example: Bb major scale

Bb C D Eb F G A Bb

As you can see, the intervals are:
root (Bb)
W step (C)
W step (D)
H step (Eb)
W step (F)
W step (G)
W step (A)
H step (Bb)

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Re: E, A, And D major scale slide positions    11:27 on Friday, August 24, 2007 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Steve
(457 points)

You are really not doing yourself any favors learning your scales by positions. If you have ever studied a language, you know that knowing a few key phrases is not the same thing as understanding the language, it's grammar, syntax, etc.
Learning scales by position is like learning how to ask where the bathroom is in another language. It's one thing you can say, but you sure don't understand the language itself.
Bob is encouraging you to dig in, learn how scales really work. Take your time, learn them right. It's a big step towards learning the language. Good luck!

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Re: E, A, And D major scale slide positions    18:04 on Saturday, August 25, 2007 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

JamesZ
(2 points)

I just finished learning them, it was easier using learning with the notes instead of just positions.

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Re: E, A, And D major scale slide positions    19:53 on Saturday, August 25, 2007 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Steve
(457 points)

Good for you! Now, get them all up to a good tempo, practice them in thirds, fourths, fifths, etc. Practice different articulations, rhythms. Got them all two octaves? See how many you can get three. When they are second nature, get started on your minors. Keep up the good work.

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Re: E, A, And D major scale slide positions    21:02 on Saturday, August 25, 2007 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

bobsacamano
(158 points)

I'm glad to hear that you worked out the scales properly. Now use Steve's advice. If you can play them in the intervals that Steve suggested, you'll know those scales backwards and forwards. Literally! Knowing your scales also makes sight reading much easier.

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Re: E, A, And D major scale slide positions    13:29 on Sunday, August 26, 2007 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Mozer1234
(38 points)

I really don't understand how you can learn how to play the scales without looking at the positions, I mean you would at least need to know the positions for the first few notes, then you could progress from there, but then when the notes start to go off the top and bottom lines then it gets alot more confusing...

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Re: E, A, And D major scale slide positions    16:05 on Sunday, August 26, 2007 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

bobsacamano
(158 points)

Well, trumpet players don't learn scales by looking at their valves. Saxophone players don't learn scales by looking at their keys. And pianists don't learn scales by looking at their fingers. How? Music theory. Learning how to play something by ear and common sense is the best way.

<Added>

A lot of it is knowing how the trombone works. If you know about the partials (also known as the overtone series), the positions in relation to the notes become second nature. This helps tremdendously in the upper register where alternate positions can come in very handy.

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Re: E, A, And D major scale slide positions    16:24 on Sunday, August 26, 2007 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

bobsacamano
(158 points)

Finally, when you know what notes can be played in what position, you don't even have to think about it. You can just play by ear and rattle off scales and arpeggios immediately.

This is the key to good sight-reading. When you get a piece of music for the first time at a rehearsal, you don't have time to look it over and try to figure out the positions for every note. For example, you'll see that the piece is in E major and you'll get the following sequence of notes: G#, A, D#, E, C#, B, A, F#, G#, E. If you know your scales and you have good sight-singing skills, this becomes extremely easy to play. You'll already know what the phrase sounds like even before you attempt to play it! Nobody has time to think about the positions when you have to play a new piece in a band starting in about twenty seconds from the time that you first receive the music. That's why learning music by positions doesn't work.

   

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