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Conn 110H 
 

Conn 110H

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Conn 110H    09:39 on Monday, February 21, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

trombone24
(20 points)

what does everyone think of this trombone? I'm thinking about buying one and want some input on how it plays, etc..

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Re: Conn 110H    12:33 on Wednesday, February 23, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Le_Tromboniste
(180 points)

Wouldn't you be better with a 2 valved bass bone?

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Re: Conn 110H    22:12 on Saturday, March 19, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

trombone24
(20 points)

I would love to have a double valve trombone but right not I cant afford one. My trombone instructor is selling his 110H and I was interested in it. I am a freshman in college and am also a music major, hopefully by next year or the next year I can get one of my college's bass horns and play on it. At our local music store they have a Jupiter double valve bass with Thayer valves but I'm not a big fan of a Thayer valve so I'm not that interested in it. But I'd give anything to have one.

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Re: Conn 110H    22:19 on Saturday, March 19, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Le_Tromboniste
(180 points)

Keep your eyes open for older used horns. You can be surprised sometimes with the bargains you can find.

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Re: Conn 110H    09:55 on Monday, March 21, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

trombone24
(20 points)

ok. thanks. what would recommend for a good horn?

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Re: Conn 110H    13:38 on Monday, March 21, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Le_Tromboniste
(180 points)

Depends on what you play. And no trombone is exactly the same, so you should just try as many as you can and find one that fits you. Popular choices are Bach 50, Yamaha 613, 622 and now 822 XENO, Edwards (though they are really expensive), older Kings (Duo Gravis) and Conns.

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Re: Conn 110H    09:55 on Wednesday, March 23, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

trombone24
(20 points)

Ok. Thanks. I'll keep a lookout for some of those. I am hopefully going up to another music store sometime soon to look at some tenors as well as some basses. I have been told that one of our directors has requested some bass trombones so I'm hoping that if we get them I will be able to use one. What would you recommend for tenor trombones? I am currently playing on an older Benge 190F(which is the universities) and love it but I'm not sure what to go with when I purchase my own. I have looked at a Conn 88H and Getzen and Edwards as well. I'm just not sure what I should go with.

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Re: Conn 110H    11:06 on Wednesday, March 23, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

mad_cow
(101 points)

If you're going to spend money on a bass trombone, you might as well save up some money and buy one with 2 valves. Also i think the Conn 110H has a rose brass bell. i personaly hate rose brass bells on any bass trombone. if you are a tennor player full time and are serious about it, i would sugest saving your money and buying a quality tennor horn like an edwards or shires. definatly keep an eye out for these horns online. Prices for used horns drop quickly.

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Re: Conn 110H    13:54 on Wednesday, March 23, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Le_Tromboniste
(180 points)

Again, for tenors this time, try as many as you can and you'll see what fits best. Yamaha 882 is great for all-around playing. Conn 88H too, but the best are older Conns. For me, Bach 42 is the perfect fit, although you won't really be able to blend in big band. It has the darkest tone, and is the ''heaviest'' tenor, if you can call it like that. As for the Conn, try finding older horns, because for 15 years, about 80% of the horns that come out of the Bach factory are crap.

If you go in the upper price range, you can go modular with Edwards or Shires. I would go with an Edwards if that is your choicem though. Shires are extremely bright horns in general. Another great options is Greenhoe, which makes optimized versions of the Conn 88H and Bach 42B.

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Re: Conn 110H    11:01 on Thursday, March 24, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

trombone24
(20 points)

I have seriously thought about going with a Bach but my friend who's a junior in high school had one and the metal was crappy quality and was in the shop a lot. It was a Bach Soloist so I'm not sure what the Strad would be like. And I am a full time tenor player right now but would like to switch to bass eventually.

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Re: Conn 110H    16:51 on Saturday, August 06, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

tbonejeff
(10 points)

The questions you should ask yourself are:

What do I think of this particular Conn 110H?
Do I like the way it plays?
Does it feel good when I play it?
Will it help me play the kind of music I want to play?
Will it help me learn how to play bass trombone?
Is it in good condition?
Can I afford it?

If you can answer "Yes" to all of those questions, then it may be the best horn for you to buy - right now. If you continue to play and continue to grow as a player, you may, at some point in the future, decide that a different horn will suit your purposes better. Then look for different equipment.


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Re: Conn 110H    01:18 on Monday, August 08, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Le_Tromboniste
(180 points)

The quality of Bach instrument is indeed sometimes quite disapointing. Their quality control is awful. I heard it is slowly getting better, but still...Conn too, are not as consistent as they used to be. The only brand whith which you can be pretty sure that two horns with the same model number play and sound the same is Yamaha. Their quality control is incredible.
That is why when buying a horn, you have to try many. If a Bach 42 or Conn 88H, for example, does not fit you, it does not mean that all 42's or all 88H's will not.

While I can probably count on an hand's fingers the number of large bore tenors that I've tried and could have seen myself playing on, I've tried a lot of horns that I knew from the first minutes of playing they would not fit me (and that includes horns from Shires, Edwards, Bach, Conn, Yamaha, etc). Some of them were good but not to my liking. Most of them were simply not good enough when compared to the handful of horns I really found were good.

All this to say, choosing the right horn is a time-expensive process. You can't just pick the first one. And it is never only a question of money. Or else all players who have the money would play on Shires or Edwards, or Thein! Which is not the case. Many top players use vintage Conns or Bachs, or newer 42Ts or Yamaha Xenos and so on! You have to forget about the name stamped on the bell. That doesn't (shouldn't) count when you pick it up and play it and decide whether it is good or not, whether it fits you or not.

tbonejeff's advice is very good and the questions he tells you to ask yourself are more than relevant.

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Re: Conn 110H    18:42 on Wednesday, December 14, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

ChiSun
(81 points)

ghajhtjsas

   

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