Stringing a Violin
 

Stringing a Violin

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Stringing a Violin    03:14 on Friday, March 12, 2004 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(James)
Hi,

I just purchased a second-hand violin and have new strings with which to ...string it with. Which strings go on which pegs, and how do I work out how far up or down the body of the violin to place the bridge?

Thanks everyone,


- James.

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Re: Stringing a Violin    03:21 on Friday, March 12, 2004 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(Liz Ward)
Hi James,


From left to right, GDAE.

The bridge goes level with the notch in the F holes.

You`d better check the soundpost is present (look through the right hand F hole, there should be a sort of wodden dowel standing up between the top and bottom plates of the violin) as if it isn`t there, you shouldn`t string it at all until the soundpost has been put up, which is not something you can do yourself..

Liz

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Re: Stringing a Violin    03:38 on Friday, March 12, 2004 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(James)
Thanks for the quick reply Liz.

Does it matter which of the GDAE strings go on which of the pegs? Looking at the pegs, it doesn`t look like there is a specific order on which the strings go on them. The third peg down from the top looks like it "might" take the low G string though, and the fourth peg looks like it might take the high E string. Does that sound about right to you?

I can see the soundpost in place through the treble F hole.

- James.


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Re: Stringing a Violin    04:38 on Friday, March 12, 2004 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(Martin Milner)
G string bottom left peg
D string top left
A string top right
E string bottom right


At first just get them on and the bridge up between the notches as Liz said. Then as you tune them up (an electronic tuner is good for this, but you can tune to a piano, tuning fork or whatever) They`ll tend to lean the bridge forward towards the scroll so keep an eye on it and if needs be lean it back carefully till it`s upright. Lie the violin in your lap, grip each side of the bridge between finger & thumb & ease it back.

The strings will continue to stretch for a couple of days, so expect a lot of retuning. Tuning one string may also put the others out slightly, so it`s a bit of a balancing process. Once the strings are close to tuned this effect does not notice.

I assume you have fine tuners on each string? Not vital, but a lot easier for tuning for those of us who are peg-ically challenged.


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Re: Stringing a Violin    07:18 on Friday, March 12, 2004 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(James)


Thanks Martin, I realised I strung the violin on all the wrong pegs after reading your post. Managed to get it right now. I am a beginner, I have no idea what fine tuners are. The tailpiece where the strings are hooked up have screws which raise or lower the parts which hold the strings.

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Re: Stringing a Violin    08:50 on Friday, March 12, 2004 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(Nox)
Those are the fine tuners. You still have to do major tuning with the pegs, but you can minimize that by using the fine tuners. Turning them clockwise raises (sharpens) the pitche and turning them counterclockwise lowers (flattens) the pitch.

To start you should turn them amost completely to the left. Then tune with the pegs. Then adjust (sharpen) with the fine tuners. You want them roughly turned to the `middle` of how far they will turn. Over time, they will eventually reach the rightmost point (because you usually end up sharping the strings with the fine tuners).

When this happens, you have to turn them counterclockwise all the way, and tune again with the peg (start the process over again).

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Re: Stringing a Violin    09:28 on Friday, March 12, 2004 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(James)
Now I get it about the fine tuners.. thanks for the advice and tips everyone, really appreciate it.

I played the piano for many years, a number of years ago. But recently (2 weeks ago) I started taking double bass lessons for some fresh inspiration and it`s really had an impression on me in regards to string instruments. I initially wanted to pick up the cello but I chose the bass instead because of it`s applicability to jazz as well as classical.

Anyway I`m absolutely loving the double bass right now. I`m renting this double bass at the moment because I can`t afford to buy one. When I saw a violin going for cheap on ebay, I snapped it up.

Ok I know cheap instruments are pretty bad, and this violin I got is a cheapo made in china (I think so anyway, but then again I know very little about string instruments at this stage) but it`s a good start for me and I`m enthusiastic about it. Is it possible for me to bring out the best out of a crappy instrument by setting it up with good strings, bridge, etc? Also, the bow that came with the violin is pretty much stuffed, it doesn`t retain its shape and actually bends towards the hairstrings when I tighten it. There`s no way I could bring the bow in for repairs could I.

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Re: Stringing a Violin    12:54 on Friday, March 12, 2004 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(Nox)
I`m not the best to ask, but let`s see if we can get you an opinion poll of advice going to sort through!

"Ok I know cheap instruments are pretty bad, and this violin I got is a cheapo made in china (I think so anyway, but then again I know very little about string instruments at this stage) but it`s a good start for me and I`m enthusiastic about it."

...some Chinese instruments can actually be very good pricewise...you get good bang for your buck...but if your was that cheap, then it`s just that cheap...

"Is it possible for me to bring out the best out of a crappy instrument by setting it up with good strings, bridge, etc?"

...yes, but it`s relatively expensive...you likely would`ve been further ahead by putting the extra money toward a better `cheap` instrument...

"Also, the bow that came with the violin is pretty much stuffed, it doesn`t retain its shape and actually bends towards the hairstrings when I tighten it. There`s no way I could bring the bow in for repairs could I."

No...use it to stake tomatos...but there are some `better` inexpensive bows available...or, alternately (and I`d do this)...just go and buy a reasonably good bow...it will make a big difference to your overall playing...(and certainly won`t hurt!)...and you should be able to use it on your next, better quality violin...

...it is recommended that you spend 1/3 to the same amount! on a bow that you do on a violin! So if a `good` violin costs $3000, your bow should cost at least $1000 (and I`m talking about the price for a quality bow - not the jacked-up prices you might pay for a collectable or a high-demand brand).


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Re: Stringing a Violin    15:21 on Friday, March 12, 2004 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(Liz Ward)
The bow stick SHOULD bend towards the hair even when it`s tightened, unless i`ve misunderstood completely what you`re saying.

liz

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Re: Stringing a Violin    16:01 on Friday, March 12, 2004 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(Nox)
Maybe I did...I thought he meant it was curving sideways (like a snake) when he tightens it...

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Re: Stringing a Violin    16:58 on Saturday, March 13, 2004 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(Harvey)
I think he meant that when he tightens it, the stick runs into the hair, and eventually goes through the hair.

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Re: Stringing a Violin    00:38 on Sunday, March 14, 2004 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(James)
lol i meant the bow bends towards the hair kinda like how a compound bow does.. the type of compound bow that you use to shoot arrows with.

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Re: Stringing a Violin    10:38 on Sunday, March 14, 2004 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(Nox)
Well, we do archery...so I think I know what you mean...all I can think of is that you`re seriously overtightening...but if you need to tighten it that much to provide enough tension to play...then you need a new bow!


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Re: Stringing a Violin    16:35 on Sunday, March 14, 2004 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(*Danielle*)
hey. about the bow bending in... some bows do bend in like at the middle towards the strings...my dads a violin teacher and so he has like lots of different bows and some do that so ya. but maybe you are tightening it too much...
tip: when you do play, tilt your bow like a very little bit towards the pegs...it`ll make a nice sound if you do it properly

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Re: Stringing a Violin    18:04 on Sunday, March 14, 2004 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes
(Nox)
That`s strange too...that`s how I was originally taught...but now I was told to tilt towards the tailpiece...

...it`s not a big deal because I can tilt the bow whereever, or not...but then why be told to do it both ways? Or is there a reason to tilt one way or the other? Does it even matter?

   





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