Franz Liszt
 

Franz Liszt

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Franz Liszt    14:46 on Thursday, March 29, 2007 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

maci25
(9 points)

I have been playing piano for 3 years. Does know somebody, when can I play The XIV. Hungarian Rapsodie from Franc Liszt?


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Re: Franz Liszt    16:36 on Thursday, March 29, 2007 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

geoffw
(14 points)

Well, nobody's stopping you now...but I wouldn't recommend it. This piece is probably hard enough that if you have to ask, you should wait. There are three main reasons.

1) Trying to play a very difficult and fast piece when you don't have sufficient technique and piano knowledge can lead to serious injury, cutting your piano playing career short (look what happened to Scriabin, et al.)

2) If you are insufficiently prepared for an advanced piece, you may learn it wrong/poorly, making it infinitely harder to learn it well later on.

3) You may become very frustrated and discouraged because you are not progressing, and be turned off from practicing, while playing pieces more at your level will lead to good progress.

That said, it's good (or neccessary) to have goals and dreams at the piano, and remember that if you practice enough and have a good teacher, you will progress. In the meantime, if this particular piece is an overriding goal that you're willing to work towards for years, there are things you can do in the meantime.

1) Learn the easiest passages. As you improve, more and more sections will be within your grasp, and you can add them. Unfortunately, I think most 3-year students will not be ready for any part of this piece yet so--

2) Learn easier pieces that teach the skills you need. For example, shortly before measure 400 there is a passage with quick staccato octave movement. This is a techinique found in many many other pieces, and you can learn the techinque AND add a piece to your repertoire by learning those pieces. Also, Liszt loves to throw in crazy fast sweeping arpeggios and/or chromatic scales. Practice those, and try to learn pieces that teach those skills. Practice the F-major scales and arpeggios.

3) Learn pieces in a similar style. Learn other pieces in F-major. When you're ready, learn easier pieces by Liszt (he's not known for it, but some of his pieces are in fact much easier). Learn pieces that use similar rhythms.

I hope this helps put you on the right track. I know you want to hear a number, but everyone progresses differently. If you have good teachers and practice 8 hours a day, it could be very very soon, or if you have no teacher and practice 15 mins a day, it could be forever. It's up to you.

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Re: Franz Liszt    12:05 on Friday, March 30, 2007 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

maci25
(9 points)

Thank you very much! I know that this piano work from Liszt is one of the hardest piano work in the World. I know I need 20 or 25 years to learn this.
Do you like Liszt, and can you play this?

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Re: Franz Liszt    18:01 on Friday, March 30, 2007 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

geoffw
(14 points)

I'm unfortunately not nearly skilled enough either, but I'm improving, too. There are a few works by Liszt that I like pretty well, like Consolation #3 and the Sonata in B minor, but right now I mostly listen to (and sometimes try to play) pieces by Beethoven and Chopin more than anyone else. I know Chopin and Liszt are often compared to each other, but I don't think they're that similar except for being contemporaries who were great pianists and composers.

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Re: Franz Liszt    10:15 on Thursday, April 05, 2007 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

nimmy
(14 points)

That was interesting geoff.

Thing is. I like to play things a little harder than my level, granted that level is only four weeks of playing. I do my lessons etc But can't help having a go a famous 'harder' peices. I can play the opening to the Bach toccota and Chopins funeral music. What this those for me is inspires me to keep at it.

The important thing is to push, but know, your limitations. So i'll play the opening of the Back and think, 'all right then that's as far as I go'

Same with the person playing Lizt, have a go, play it correct but be aware not to pic up any bad habits. There again I'm sure you know that already

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Re: Franz Liszt    10:42 on Thursday, April 05, 2007 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

maci25
(9 points)

I like playing harder piece than my level. I'm in the Piano school 1, but I playing the Humoresque.

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Re: Franz Liszt    10:43 on Thursday, April 05, 2007 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

geoffw
(14 points)

Yes, I agree that one of the most important things in studying piano is motivation, and the best motivation is playing music that you recognize and enjoy. It's especially satisfying when you play something that once seemed impossible.

For people who are just starting out, this is especially important, because very few individual pieces are both interesting and within your grasp. As long as you don't do anything that will injure you, playing snippets of (much) harder pieces probably won't have a negative effect on your pianistic development, and it can help bridge the gap while you improve. And of course playing pieces that are only somewhat above your level is how you improve your skills.

Just realize that there's the possibility of making it hard to learn those pieces well later. I learned Fur Elise almost 20 years ago, and I've played it probably a thousand times, and I have an easier time today with pieces I learned last month, because I've been unable to shake the bad habits I developed. And I learned the piece only when my teacher started me on it, so it wasn't even all that above my level. I just didn't know how to learn a piece properly yet, so I "learned" a few flaws.

   

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