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id model and year of french horn 
 

id model and year of french horn

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id model and year of french horn    14:30 on Monday, March 30, 2009 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Luze
(7 points)

I just bought a conn double horn. nickel plate, serial starts with 8. don't know if it is 8D or 6D or possibly something else. The first tuning slide crosses to the front, the rotor for the thumb lines up with valve rotors, not offset like I have seen on 8D. Any clue?

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Re: id model and year of french horn    16:19 on Monday, March 30, 2009 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

JOhnlovemusic
(1273 points)

Huh?

Okay, you have Conn french horn in nickle. Whatever number the serial number starts with has nothing to do with the model number.

If the main tunign slide crosses over to the front (and their are two F horn tunign slide in the back on the bottom) then you have a 6D.

It would be easier to identify if you could give the entire serial number in pattern, Like, 800,XXX, or 89 234xxx. If there is a space it is very important, also the location of the serial number is important. And of course picture always tell a thoughsand words.
Feel free to PM me and I would be happy to help you.

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Re: id model and year of french horn    09:52 on Monday, April 06, 2009 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Luze
(7 points)

thanks for your reply. it is a 6D. no space in serial#, located on the bar that supports the lever, over the second valve, # is802684. Seller says believes it is about 1959 or so. Also I have acquired 4 mouthpieces over the years. I don't remember what specifics to choose. My weakness right now is upper range. will probably return with more practice. Mouthpieces are:Benge 11;Schilke 31; Holton farkas model M C; Olds 3.

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Re: id model and year of french horn    11:06 on Monday, April 06, 2009 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

JOhnlovemusic
(1273 points)

You are lucky !!!!!! You do have a 1959 Conn 6D. I just left mine with Mark Atkinson for some cleaning. The 1959 6D's sound great and they are worth way more than anyone thinks. I constantly get compliments on mine and people (horn players) are surprised it is a 6D. ?The 6D was THE horn in the major symphonies in the fifties and sixties. If you decide to get rid of it in the future please give me a chance to buy it from you.

Mouthpieces - I would suggest the Farkas or Shilke. I love the Shilke 31 but it is a big mouthpiece. Perhaps start with the Farkas and then move to the Shilke 31. Range is from proper practice.

Congrats - that will be a great horn. I am guessing the leadpipe is probably bent though. You might want to have a good quality repair person straighten it. Be sure they use pitch or some other product in the pipe when they straighten it. It should cost about $200 or so. And is well worth it because it will keep you in proper posture.

John

<Added>

Oh, and I don't think that is nickel silver. The slide tubes are nickel silver but your mouthpipe, bell, and body I think are brass with silver plate. (i could be wrong)Still a great find. The horn will play beautifully. If it doesn't then get back in touch with me and I will tell you what to do set it up just right.



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Re: id model and year of french horn    09:21 on Wednesday, April 08, 2009 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Luze
(7 points)

Thanks for your help, I sent you some photos of my horn. What kind or brand of valve oil and slide oil should I use. It is all really clean and no problems getting everything apart to clean but certainly want to to prevent problems and maintain well.

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Re: id model and year of french horn    13:08 on Wednesday, April 08, 2009 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

JOhnlovemusic
(1273 points)

WOW!! Nice horn Luze, nice horn.

oils, grease, maintenance - -
You have lots of options to choose from now-a-days. I am using ZAJA PRO rotor oil for the top bearings and Hetman syntehtic (#13)for the bottom rotors. I personally don't like Cass oil, but I must say that two people I repsect very much in the horn making world use Cass oil religiously on all parts. Slide Grease: Hetman has a nice little 10cc tub out that works really well. Start with #8 and if that is not good enough get #9.

When to oil!?!
MINIMUM/MANDATORY - Oil your horn everytime you take it out to play it.
RECOMMENDED - also oil your horn everytime you put it away.
SUGGESTED - also oil every hour of actual playing time.
MY ROUTINE - At home I oil my horn in the morning before doing warm ups. I then oil it again when I start my practicing, when I come back from a break, and when I am done. When I am performing I oil my horn when I get to the location and I oil again at the intermissions, and when I get home.

You can never oil your horn too much it only takes a drop each time. However, if you wait until it needs it you have already caused damage to the rotor.

When to Grease?!?
Grease your slides so they are really smooth and perfect. Then anytime the slide is anything less than that, grease it. Don't wait for it to get hard, do it before that.
I used to wipe off and re-grease the first weekend of each month. It worked well for me.

Snake the leadpipe/mouthpipe once a month.

If those cork stoppers are old change them over to neopreme or silicone stoppers. They will be quieter and last longer. Then replace the stoppers every two years, don't wait for them to dry out, shrink, and then fall out during a concert like a freind of mine last month. I replace my strings at least once a year.

If you have questions on any of this email me and I will email you back including photos if you need them. Nice horn. I don't know what you paid (and don't tell me) but you got a good deal there. That horn will sound great and last longer than you or I will live.

   

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