OMG Damnit! Help me! Now! :D
 

OMG Damnit! Help me! Now! :D

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OMG Damnit! Help me! Now! :D    05:05 on Sunday, November 05, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Ante
(4 points)

Hi all!.. I'm a 15 year old guy from Sweden and I can't say I'm new on piano.. Okay I've played for 3½ years, and that's not long..Or is it?...:S Well.. I can now play all 3 movements on the 'Pathétique Sonate', the third Mov. on 'The Tempest'. I can play a bit on the third Mov. of The Moonlight Sonata too.. And I can olso play all movements on the Suite Gothique (For Organ). You all people who's into this kind of music can immediately figure out who I like the most? Yah, Beethoven of course! But the thing is: I've always been a person who like alternations sometimes... Yeah, some variations and changes. I've started with S. Rachmaninoff right now, and his Préludes. But... Hmm.. I don't know how to say this.. Haha, I feel kinda' ashamed of this... ^^ HAHA! The thing is that I can play quite advanced pieces... But I'm not that good when it comes to notes... :S I suck literally... I wanted help with something that's written down on Rachmaninoff's Prélude in C-sharp minor Op.3 No.2(You all should be aware about this piece, because it's kind of "famous")... Well anyway... Do anyone here have this notes at home and can tell me what the small "x" means...? (There are 4 of them at the first row).. OMG haha, I know that this small "x", that's located just before notes, are in all of Beethovens piano sonatas...! :S But I still don't know what it is! :D Damn I suck at this, hahaa. But please help me! What is this X?! :D And sorry for my crappy English!

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Re: OMG Damnit! Help me! Now! :D    10:21 on Sunday, November 05, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Account Closed
(904 points)

You are probably talking about a double-sharp. Say that the key siganature has four sharps, this means that any one of those sharps (or any other note with the "x") can be moved up two semi-tones with that "x" in front. So an "f" double-sharp would become "g" natural, "c" double-sharp would become "d" natural, and so on.

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Re: OMG Damnit! Help me! Now! :D    14:22 on Wednesday, November 15, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Ante
(4 points)

Aha...! :S But hey.. In Rachmaninoff's Prélude Op.2 No.3 - In the left hand... The first X printed... What is that? Hah ^^ It's like f-sharp with 'x'?

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Re: OMG Damnit! Help me! Now! :D    15:31 on Wednesday, November 15, 2006 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Account Closed
(904 points)

An "F" double-sharp would be a "G" natural.

<Added>

I think I've found it, and the "F" double-sharp would be a "G" natural, then later in the measure, it goes back "F" sharp again.

   

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