What kind?
 

What kind?

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What kind?    14:57 on Friday, December 02, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

OboeBassoon
(4 points)

Hey, I've been playing horn since 6th grade now and I'm a senior in high school. I'm just wondering what kind of horn should i get and what kind of mouthpiece. My horn preference is a detachable bell, gold horn( i like silver too but i just like gold better) alexander or holton but i can maybe try another one that is better... I have thicker lips so i'm just wondering what size and brand of mouthpiece.

THank you!

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Re: What kind?    00:10 on Saturday, December 03, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

JOhnlovemusic
(1277 points)

There are so many decent horns out there now a days. It would be impossible totell you which ONE to get. When my students are ready to buy a horn or step up to a 'better' horn the things I take in consideration are:
What type music will you be playing (band music, orchestra music, chamber music)?
Are they going to become a professional player?
Where will they be playing (west coast, east coast, europe)?

Mouthpieces?
Depends on the horn they're playing and also where they'll be playing and with what other instruments. Then I let them try some of my mouthpieces and then discuss which they should get.

You really have to paly a lot of horns and mouthpieces to decide what is best for you. Whatever works best, makes you soudn the best, and lets you get around on the instrument is the correct horn for you.

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Re: What kind?    06:26 on Saturday, December 03, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

OboeBassoon
(4 points)

I'm going to be playing band music and probably orchestra music.

Yes, I want to be a professional player.

I will be on the east coast.

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Re: What kind?    08:34 on Sunday, December 04, 2011 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

JOhnlovemusic
(1277 points)

Bang for the buck for your situation my suggestions would be . . .

Instrument
Yamaha 667.
1)You can get one now as is and then later have it modified by Wes Hatch at Wes Hatch Horns.
2)You can get one from Wes and he can modify it now.
3)You can get a modified 667 from Jacob Medlin at Medlin horns.

The 667 is a Geyer wrap horn with a medium bell throat. Yamaha's generally have a good even in tune scale. And this will work well with whatever you do. Modification by Wes Hatch and Jacob Medlin are a relative inexpensive way to upgrade the instrument to an almost hand built top professional instrument. I believe both Wes and Jacob have a contact with Yamaha where they can get a new horn for you and do the modification for the same price or LESS than other popular stock horns.

Mouthpiece
1)Start with a Moosewood A underpart and an M1 series rim. That should do you well in almost all situations. Then you can experiement later if you want to.
2)Laskey 75G
3) Schilke 30C2

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Re: What kind?    23:25 on Saturday, May 12, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Val_Wells
(216 points)

Wes does wonderful work. I got a chance to tootle around with a Yamaha that he "souped up" at the IHS symposium in 2011. That horn was incredible, especially for the price. Wes is amazing.

Valerie Wells
The Balanced Embouchure
http://beforhorn.blogspot.com/

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Re: What kind?    22:51 on Monday, May 14, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

hornplayer4ever
(1 point)

Hi, I am about to graduate high school and want to further my career in music. I've been in band since I was in fifth grade however, I started out playing clarinet and not until recently started playing horn (like Jr. yr to be exact) and have never had to deal with looking into my own horn. I've been looking around at what other people have been saying about which horns to buy and I was wondering if I should take hand size in to consideration, also I don't live on any of the coasts, more like towards the middle of the country, so does that effect what brand i should be looking at buying as well? I will gladly take any advice I can get.

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Re: What kind?    18:26 on Friday, May 18, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Val_Wells
(216 points)

The above advice on horns should apply to you as well. For horns, size really doesn't matter unless you have a shoulder injury(ies) or other physical limitations.

I'm a small woman (little old lady, to be exact) with small hands. I play a heavy double horn with a large bell throat. Bell throat size isn't a problem other than for stopped horn parts, so I use a brass stop mute for that. For the weight issue: (1) I use a strap to help support the weight of the instrument which relieves pressure from the left hand and (2)I usually play on leg unless I need more volume & projection then I can easily lift the horn because the strap helps. See my Comfy Horn Strap blog for an inexpensive strap I designed. http://comfyhornstrap.blogspot.com/ Anyone who sews could easily copy my simple design.

Valerie Wells
The Balanced Embouchure Method
http://beforhorn.blogspot.com/
http://comfyhornstrap.blogspot.com/


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Re: What kind?    13:15 on Wednesday, May 30, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

phred
(87 points)

HAHA! Stopped horn parts, big throat. That was never a problem on my little Holton 181, but the Paxman 25A is HUGE! I'd add to play as many as you can, and remember that you will sound like you on almost any instrument you pick up. If you are doing orchestral and band, and possibly chamber, I would think about how much you have to spend, and whether you can get a good older, medium throat instrument for chamber/classical, and a modern monster with great flexibility and dynamic range for the modern side of things. Even though I'm loving my Paxman, it is a modern instrument, whereas the 50 year old Holton is much more in the vain of an earlier instrument. I still prefer the sound of Mozart on that, and its PP is great, and the section of the overtone series where it has rough notching is hardly played in any classical concerto. If you have 5-6k, you may consider two used horns. If you are East Coast, Pope Repair has some excellent used horns. Remember, models like the Conn 6D had some great instruments, that were overshadowed by the 8D, and can be picked up reasonably. I had an 8D which was purchased for me, and hated it, but I picked out my Holton after playing 30 or 40 horns. It suited me all the way through college.

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Re: What kind?    01:01 on Thursday, May 31, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

phred
(87 points)

Valerie,
How does your comfy strap compare to the duck foot? I've always had problems with a pinky that has got a dramatic hitch with weakness associated in certain positions. I've got a duck-foot on the Paxman that I'm thinking of sewing up some kind of padding for, and considering having one installed on the Holton. But... if this works as well or better, then maybe I'll try that.
Doug

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Re: What kind?    22:24 on Friday, June 01, 2012 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

Val_Wells
(216 points)

Both the duck's foot and the Comfy Horn Strap provide for support the horn at the same place on the left hand. My Comfy Horn Strap requires no professional installation, and is fully adjustable, over & over again, anytime, anyday. The horn is not damaged or marred in any way using my strap. Once the duck's foot is installed, it can't be adjusted. If you sell your horn, the duck's foot goes with it or the horn is left with marks from being "uninstalled." My Comfy HOrn strap is easily removed & used on any other horn. Also my Comfy Horn Strap is soft, cotton. The duck's foot is hard metal.

There are a few more details on my blog.

Valerie Wells
http://comfyhornstrap.blogspot.com/


   

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