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Curious Pedaling question 
 

Curious Pedaling question

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Curious Pedaling question    20:38 on Sunday, July 13, 2008 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

JOhnlovemusic
(1273 points)

This might sound weird but I am curious.

When I was in college (c.1983) in orchestration class the professor had us write harp pedalings in blue and red ink under the music. Blue for moving the pedal flat and red for moving the pedal sharp. Was this just his way of making sure we knew what we were writing or is there something historically that rationalizes this?

Is pedaling even notated anymore? I would assume the harpist would set the pedals according the key signature of the piece.

Anyone ever hear of this?

Thanks.


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Re: Curious Pedaling question    11:29 on Tuesday, July 15, 2008 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

JOhnlovemusic
(1273 points)

Thank you, then it was probably just that.

It was probably his way of making sure we were placing the pedaling correctly. And would certainly make it easier to grade all the assignments quickly I suppose.

So, not to age you, but did you do a lot of writing on onion paper? Wonderful stuff !!!!

John

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Re: Curious Pedaling question    19:16 on Tuesday, July 15, 2008 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

JOhnlovemusic
(1273 points)

In the early 80's I used to spend quite a lot of time over at Dr. Barney Childs house. He had lots of onion paper. He always had something out on his dinning room table. I don't think I ever ate on that table. We always would eat and drink in the living room. He wouldn't allow drinks or food near the kitchens dining table. Never used his houses office for music writing. I really liked wirting on onion paper, it just made me feel so much more a part of what I was writing.

IF any of you get a chance to use onion paper, wether for music or just writing a note to family and freinds, it is great paper !!

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Re: Curious Pedaling question    10:33 on Wednesday, July 16, 2008 Vote for this post Vote against this post 0 votes

JOhnlovemusic
(1273 points)

Yep, Barney (Childs) is a major 20th century piece of work, and a piece of work alone; him and Phillip Rehfeldt.
Had quite a few garbage burritos, and Early Times bourbon while watching Laker games with Barney. I think I will leave the memoirs to the others though.

My gosh, some of the stories.
The one day I beat him at scabble. . .
The lecture I got the one time I offered him a drink of Vodka (he only drinks things you can see).

Here is a funny story . . .
He was getting an award from Sigma Alpha Iota. One of my teachers calls me up at 11pm the night before. She is sick, really sick and wants to know if I will play Variations on a Theme for David Racussen. I'm the only one she knows who has played it recently. So I say yes.

Many years later I visit the University of Redlands and they were doing a big celebration of all Barney's music and his contribution to the music world. There were lots of seminars and in the small recital hall there are several pieces, one of which is Variation on a Themee... I go there with my girlfriend and sit in the front row. Before the recital starts my past teacher comes out from behind stage and sits down next to me. She is sniffling and her nose is runninng and she is coughing. She asks me if I would be willing to play the piece again for her since with her cold she doesn't think she can play it very well.

Barney did not like getting awards. He was thinking he was on the cutting edge and felt awards were signs of mediocracy(sp?). Very dry sense of humor.

   

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