Roaring 20s Songs for Voice

Roaring 20s Songs for Voice

Step back in time with a collection of tunes from one of the most dynamic decades of the 20th century. This collection is not just a set of tunes; it's a portal to an age of jazz clubs, speakeasies, and a generation dancing towards modernity.

1.   Zequinha Abreu  -  Tico-Tico no fuba

Abreu, Zequinha


"Tico-Tico no fubá" is the title of a renowned Brazilian choro song composed by Zequinha de Abreu in 1917. Its original title was "Tico-Tico no Farelo," but since Brazilian guitarist Américo Jacomino Canhoto (1889–1928) had a work with the same title, Abreu's work was given its present name in 1931. "Fubá" is a type of maize flour and "tico-tico" is the name of a bird, the rufous-collared sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis). Hence, "tico-tico no fubá" means "sparrow in the cornmeal."



Tico-Tico no fuba


2.   Carlos Gardel  -  El Dia Que Me Quieras



El Dia Que Me Quieras


3.   A. G. Villoldo  -  El Choclo (Tango)

Villoldo, A. G.


El Choclo means "The Corn Cob" and is one of the most popular tangos. It was written by Ángel Villoldo, an Argentine musician, apparently in honour of a nightclub owner, who was known as "El Choclo".



El Choclo (Tango)


4.   Carlos Gardel  -  Por Una Cabeza

Gardel, Carlos


"Por una Cabeza" is an tango song with music and lyrics written in 1935 by Carlos Gardel and Alfredo Le Pera respectively. It has appeared in numerous movies, most famously in Scene of a Woman with Al Pacino, but also, for example, in Schindler's List.



Por Una Cabeza


5.   Di Capua  -  O sole mio

Di Capua, Eduardo


"O sole mio" is a globally known Neapolitan song written in 1898. Its lyrics were written by Giovanni Capurro and the melody was composed by Eduardo di Capua. There are other versions of "O sole mio" but it is usually sung in the original Neapolitan language. "O sole mio" is the Neapolitan equivalent of standard Italian "Il sole mio" and translates literally as "my sunshine." In the UK in the 1980s the song was famously used for series of television commercials for Cornetto ice-cream, sung to the words "Just one Cornetto..."



O sole mio


6.   Carlos Gardel  -  Por Una Cabeza (from the film Scent of a Woman)

Gardel, Carlos


"Por una Cabeza" is an tango song with music and lyrics written in 1935 by Carlos Gardel and Alfredo Le Pera respectively. It has appeared in numerous movies, most famously in Scene of a Woman with Al Pacino, but also, for example, in Schindler's List.



Por Una Cabeza (from the film Scent of a Woman)


7.   Carlos Gardel  -  Por Una Cabeza

Gardel, Carlos


"Por una Cabeza" is an tango song with music and lyrics written in 1935 by Carlos Gardel and Alfredo Le Pera respectively. It has appeared in numerous movies, most famously in Scene of a Woman with Al Pacino, but also, for example, in Schindler's List.



Por Una Cabeza


8.   Carlos Gardel  -  Por Una Cabeza (from the film Scent of a Woman)

Gardel, Carlos


"Por una Cabeza" is an tango song with music and lyrics written in 1935 by Carlos Gardel and Alfredo Le Pera respectively. It has appeared in numerous movies, most famously in Scene of a Woman with Al Pacino, but also, for example, in Schindler's List.



Por Una Cabeza (from the film Scent of a Woman)


9.   Carrie Jacobs-Bon.. -  I Love You Truly



I Love You Truly


10.   Carlos Gardel  -  Por Una Cabeza

Gardel, Carlos


"Por una Cabeza" is an tango song with music and lyrics written in 1935 by Carlos Gardel and Alfredo Le Pera respectively. It has appeared in numerous movies, most famously in Scene of a Woman with Al Pacino, but also, for example, in Schindler's List.



Por Una Cabeza


11.   Zequinha Abreu  -  Tico-Tico no fuba

Abreu, Zequinha


"Tico-Tico no fubá" is the title of a renowned Brazilian choro song composed by Zequinha de Abreu in 1917. Its original title was "Tico-Tico no Farelo," but since Brazilian guitarist Américo Jacomino Canhoto (1889–1928) had a work with the same title, Abreu's work was given its present name in 1931. "Fubá" is a type of maize flour and "tico-tico" is the name of a bird, the rufous-collared sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis). Hence, "tico-tico no fubá" means "sparrow in the cornmeal."



Tico-Tico no fuba


12.   Gallini  -  La Rose (No. 15 from 'A New Collection of Forty-Fou...



La Rose (No. 15 from 'A New Collection of Forty-Fou...


13.   Carrie Jacobs-Bon.. -  I Love You Truly



I Love You Truly


14.   Zequinha Abreu  -  Tico-Tico no fuba

Abreu, Zequinha


"Tico-Tico no fubá" is the title of a renowned Brazilian choro song composed by Zequinha de Abreu in 1917. Its original title was "Tico-Tico no Farelo," but since Brazilian guitarist Américo Jacomino Canhoto (1889–1928) had a work with the same title, Abreu's work was given its present name in 1931. "Fubá" is a type of maize flour and "tico-tico" is the name of a bird, the rufous-collared sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis). Hence, "tico-tico no fubá" means "sparrow in the cornmeal."



Tico-Tico no fuba


15.   A. G. Villoldo  -  El Choclo (tango)

Villoldo, A. G.


El Choclo means "The Corn Cob" and is one of the most popular tangos. It was written by Ángel Villoldo, an Argentine musician, apparently in honour of a nightclub owner, who was known as "El Choclo".



El Choclo (tango)


16.   Charles L. Johnso.. -  Dill Pickles



Dill Pickles


17.   Quirino Mendoza y.. -  Jesusita en Chihuahua (Mexican Polka)

Cortes, Quirino Mendoza y


"Jesusita en Chihuahua" is a Mexican polka which was written by Quirino Mendoza y Cortés while he was serving as a Lt. Colonel in the Mexican Revolution and directing the military band in Puebla. Its premiere was held on Christmas Day 1916 and it has since been covered by a multitude of artists. The composition became a trademark of the Mexican Revolution and was Pancho Villa's favorite musical piece to have his bands play during combat. The piece centers on soldaderas; women who accompanied the revolutionaries, tending to their needs and on occasion even taking up arms to participate in combat.



Jesusita en Chihuahua (Mexican Polka)


18.   George Cohan  -  Give my Regards to Broadway



Give my Regards to Broadway


19.   Zequinha Abreu  -  Tico-Tico no fuba

Abreu, Zequinha


"Tico-Tico no fubá" is the title of a renowned Brazilian choro song composed by Zequinha de Abreu in 1917. Its original title was "Tico-Tico no Farelo," but since Brazilian guitarist Américo Jacomino Canhoto (1889–1928) had a work with the same title, Abreu's work was given its present name in 1931. "Fubá" is a type of maize flour and "tico-tico" is the name of a bird, the rufous-collared sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis). Hence, "tico-tico no fubá" means "sparrow in the cornmeal."



Tico-Tico no fuba


20.   Stephen Foster  -  Oh Susanna



Oh Susanna
















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