Interval Inversion (Music Theory Lesson)



Interval Inversion (Music Theory Lesson)

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In music, the verb invert means to move the lowest note in a group an octave higher.

In this lesson, we will be inverting intervals.




For our first example, let's invert a perfect fifth: C to G.




To invert this interval, move the lowest note (the C) an octave higher.




The result is a perfect fourth: G to C.




Perfect intervals will always invert to other perfect intervals. Fourths and fifths will invert to each other.




Let's invert a major third: C to E.




Move the lowest note an octave higher.




The result is a minor sixth: E to C.




Minor intervals and major intervals invert to each other. And thirds and sixths invert to each other.




Let's invert a major seventh: C to B.




Move the lowest note an octave higher.




The result is a minor second: B to C.




Seconds and sevenths invert to each other.




Finally, diminished and augmented intervals invert to each other.




To demonstrate this, let's invert an augmented fourth: C to F#. Move the lowest note an octave higher. The result is a diminished fifth: F# to C




Use this chart to quickly invert intervals.













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